Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British
Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British

Durotriges Strainer, Romano- British

Regular price £45.00
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Details

The original of this stunning straining bowl was discovered during excavations by the Durotriges project, which carried out an investigation into the prehistoric and Roman societies of central southwestern Britain.  One of the purposes of this invaluable research was to discover to what extent the Romanisation of Britain altered the customs of those already living in Britain.  And, possibly most excitingly, the extent to which these peoples of Britain retained their own personal identify during the 400 years of occupation.  

The investigation included excavations of sites that were inhabited by the Iron Age tribe the Durotriges.  A culturally distinct group of people who occupied an area of land roughly within the boundaries of modern day Dorset, as well as, sites throughout Wiltshire and Somerset.

After Roman occupation in AD 43 it was previously believed that the unique practices of many native cultures were eradicated.  The Durotriges Project has set out to examine later Iron Age culture prior to the arrival of the Romans and the true extent to which it evolved throughout occupation and beyond.  Happily, it seems that the Durotriges maintained much of their unique identity and practices throughout this time.

Amongst the practices and culture that set the Durotriges aside from their neighbouring tribes was their exquisite pottery, which includes this beautifully burnished straining bowls.  A time consuming and laborious item to create, with the burnishing finish alone taking over 45 minutes, the Durotriges clearly did not conform to the Roman ideal of mass production in pottery.  

At present there is no evidence for what the Durotriges use this vessel for, although it is likely to have been a highly useful kitchen gadget.  That could have been used to strain all manner of food and beverages. 

Production

This replica Romano-British pot has been hand made in Northumberland by Potted History, based on an original artefact.  It has been fired to a temperature of between 800 & 1000 Centigrade, to emulate the same techniques that the original potters would have employed nearly two thousand years ago. This process often results in variations of the surface colour and texture, as is common with the original Roman Pottery.  As each pot varies you many not receive the exact strainer in the image, but we will select one that represents your colour choice. You can be sure that due to the variations caused by the firing process your pot will be a one of a kind. 

Materials

Earthenware, terracotta reduction fired

Earthenware, terracotta red slip finish

Dimensions

Approx. 110 mm tall, 160 mm diameter

 Health and Safety

This is a Museum Quality Replica made using the tools and techniques that would have been used during the Iron Age era.  As this is an unglazed pot with a porous surface it will absorb some of the flavours during the cooking process, which does add to the flavour of future dishes. However, it does also mean that this pot does not meet modern Health and Safety standards and therefore we do not advise that it is used for cooking with.  When the Iron Age people who cooked in these pots they would rely on applying sufficient heat to the pot and contents to ensure that all bacteria was killed. Heating to over 70°C for at least 10 minutes would have killed most disease causing bacteria and temperatures of 100°C would do even more.

Postage
All items are sent using a second class postal service, if you wish to have an item sent first class please contact my for a quote. Many Thanks